Almost 50 years after man walked on the moon, the “giant leap for mankind” is under the microscope once again – with conspiracy theorists convinced they have proof one of the moon landings was fake.

A picture allegedly taken in December 1972 of the final Apollo 17 moon mission has been shared online, and shows what one YouTuber believes is the reflection of a “stagehand” in the helmet of one of the astronauts.

The photo, uploaded to YouTube this week by a user named Streetcap1 is entitled “Reflection in a Visor,” and Streetcap1 suggests this casts doubt onto whether the 1972 moon landing, in particular, was staged.

“I thought it looked a bit strange, so I took a picture of it using my software,” Streetcap1 says in the video commentary.

“What we appear to have here is a figure of a human not wearing a spacesuit, circa early 70s… Apollo 17 photograph,” he explained of the picture. “There was some dispute back in 2009 of the legitimacy of these photos.”

“I’m just going to make a little video here and upload it and you can let me know what you think,” Streetcap1 added, explaining he did believe in the moon landing but was now in doubt due to the photograph.

“You can see some sort of, it looks like a man, back in the early 70s, long hair, wearing some sort of waistcoat-type thing… and a shadow of that figure presumably,” he said.

“This is starting to make me think. Where’s this guy’s spacesuit?” he added of the final moon mission, crewed by Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans, and Harrison H. Schmitt, the first scientist-astronaut to land on the moon.

And his discovery appears to have a lot of fellow conspiracy theorists excited, with some commenting underneath the picture that the user has made a “good spot,” while others dismissed it as being photoshopped, or pointing out the reflection is another astronaut.

The 1972 Apollo mission was, of course, not the first manned mission to make it to the moon – that honor belongs to Apollo 11, with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, who took the first steps on the moon on July 20, 1969.

11_14_Apollo_moon_landingBuzz Aldrin in a photograph taken by fellow astronaut Neil Armstrong during the Apollo 11 moon landing in July 1969. In Andy Weir’s “Artemis,” the landing site is preserved one of the main tourist attractions for visitors to the first and only city on the moon.NASA/REUTERS

However, the entire question of whether any mission made it to the moon has long been a fond topic of discussion for conspiracy theorists, with pictures and footage from the landing scrutinized over the years by people determined to find proof.

Over the years, such conspiracy theories have been debunked, from the claim that the rocks collected from by astronauts are actually from Antarctica (geologists confirm this is not the case) to the American flag apparently blowing in the “wind” (just flexible aluminum that vibrated after being handled by the astronauts, folks).

The first in a series of four advanced polar-orbiting satellites launched to space on its third try early Saturday (Nov. 18), turning its watchful eye to improving the accuracy of weather forecasts and Earth observations.

The new Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite, or JPSS-1, launched into orbit atop a United Launch Alliance-built Delta II rocket at 4:47 a.m. EST (0947 GMT), lighting up the predawn sky over its Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The successful liftoff came after two scrubbed launch attempts earlier this week due to high winds and boats inside the launch range restriction zone offshore.

“Things went absolutely perfect today,” NASA launch manager Omar Baez said after the JPSS-1 launch. “The nation’s got another wonderful weather asset up in space.” [The JPSS-1 Weather Satellite’s Mission in Pictures]

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in partnership with NASA, operates both geostationary satellites, like GOES-16, which stay in a fixed spot over Earth as they orbit, as well as polar-orbiting satellites, like Suomi NPP, which launched in 2011. Suomi NPP was originally intended to test the technology in store for JPSS-1, officials said at a news conference Sunday (Nov. 12), but it has become a valuable weather and Earth analysis satellite.

The United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket carrying the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) weather satellite for NASA and NOAA lifts off from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California on Nov. 18, 2017.
The United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket carrying the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) weather satellite for NASA and NOAA lifts off from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California on Nov. 18, 2017.

Credit: United Launch Alliance

“This is huge,” Greg Mandt, director of the JPSS program, said during live commentary just after the dazzling liftoff of JPSS-1. “JPSS 1 is part of a national polar orbiting weather satellite program, and we really need this because 85 percent of all the date from our weather forecast models come from this series of weather satellite.We’re looking forward to getting good data from this satellite.”

JPSS-1 will follow in Suomi NPP’s path — literally — by chasing its precursor around in the same polar orbit, boasting “instruments so precise that they can measure the temperature to better than a tenth of a degree from the surface of the Earth all the way to the edge of space,” Mandt said during the Nov. 12 news conference. The spacecraft will pass around the globe every 90 minutes.

The 14.8-foot (4.5 meters), 5,060-lb. (2,295 kilograms) spacecraft’s five instruments will let it observe Earth and its climate over the long term while also pinpointing immediate weather changes. The satellite’s full mission cost, including development and the whole life of the mission, is $1.6 billion.

“With such an active and extremely dangerous hurricane season we’ve recently encountered — and the destructive wildfires we’ve seen around the planet, and particularly in California in the last year — JPSS-1 is arriving at just the right time,” Steve Volz, director of NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service, said during the news conference.

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite is released into orbit from the second stage of its United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket after a successful launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California n Nov. 18, 2017.
The Joint Polar Satellite System-1 satellite is released into orbit from the second stage of its United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket after a successful launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California n Nov. 18, 2017.

Credit: NASA TV

The JPSS-1 liftoff marks the second-to-last launch for Delta II rockets, which debuted in 1989 and have been responsible for 50 NASA launches, carrying a long list of satellites and Mars missions to space, officials said at the news conference. The final satellite to be launched on a Delta II rocket would be ICESat-2, which is currently set to launch in 2018.

Just under an hour after launch, JPSS-1 was released from the rocket’s second stage, and the stage performed an extra engine burn to move out of the way and prepare to release the rocket’s other passengers: five miniature satellites called cubesats, which will examine 3D printing of polymers in space, as well as a miniaturized weather-measurement system, which will study how components and computation are impacted by space radiation and more. All five of the small satellite travelers were successfully deployed by 85 minutes after launch. [Hurricane Watch: How Satellites Track Huge Storms from Space]

JPSS-1 itself, which will be renamed NOAA-20 once it’s declared operational in orbit, will use its instruments to measure atmospheric temperature, moisture, ozone levels, vegetation and rainfall across the globe. (Read in more detail about JPSS-1’s five instruments here.)

“All of these instruments can work in tandem,” Mandt said at the news conference. “For example, the VIIRS [Visible, Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite] can tell us the location of a fire and track the smoke plumes, while the CrIS [Cross-track Infrared Sounder] can measure carbon monoxide and methane from the fire, allowing us to see where air quality might be affected.”

And in its turn, JPSS-1 will work with Suomi NPP and other weather satellites — plus JPSS-2 through 4, when they eventually launch — to provide an uninterrupted picture of Earth’s weather and climate conditions.

ULA's Delta II rocket used six solid rocket boosters to help heft the JPSS-1 polar-orbiting weather satellite and five experimental cubesats into space.
ULA’s Delta II rocket used six solid rocket boosters to help heft the JPSS-1 polar-orbiting weather satellite and five experimental cubesats into space.

Credit: NOAA

“NOAA’s mission as an operational agency is to be the trusted deliverer of Earth observations without interruption,” Volz said at the news conference. “Many of the national infrastructure elements, the weather forecasts, all of the users in the nation rely on knowing the weather forecast will be there every day, every six hours, without interruption.”

With JPSS-1 joining Suomi NPP in orbit, the system will no longer have a single point of failure — whether from a collision with orbital debris or a power failure that could give NOAA a forecasting blind spot.

“We have a young, fresh J1, as the aging and mature Suomi-NPP can continue to operate, so that we now are getting ready for J2,” which will someday be the new-arrival satellite to the older JPSS-1, he added. “We want to have that cadence set up.”

Agents celebrate after buying the auction of Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘Salvator Mundi’ during the Post-War and Contemporary Art evening sale at Christie’s on November 15, 2017 in New York City.
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images
  • Leonardo da Vinci’s “Salvator Mundi,” the world’s most-expensive painting, was auctioned off for a staggering $450 million.
  • You can’t rush art.

The world’s most expensive painting was auctioned off at a staggering price of $450 million Wednesday, offering a glimpse not only at the supposed artwork of a world-renowned artist, but the prohibitively expensive world of art.

Bidding on Leonardo da Vinci’s “Salvator Mundi,” which translates to “Savior of the World,” opened at $70 million, but increased almost immediately to $95 million. The 26-inch-tall depiction of Christ dates back to around 1500, and is one of the fewer than 20 artworks in existence that is generally accepted to be from Leonardo da Vinci.

As the price went up, agents could be seen frantically discussing the developments over the phone with their clients. During the proceeding, Jussi Pylkkänen, Christie’s Global President and auctioneer for the sale, made a few classy quips during the process.

“Are we all done,” Pylkkänen coolly asked the room at one point, gesturing toward the busy agents. “Maybe not, don’t take the photograph quite yet.”

“Will you give me 290,” Pylkkänen asked one of the agents.

“300,” the agent replied.

“I thought so,” Pylkkänen said, amid gasps and applause. “$300 million. Let’s see if that’s done it.”

But the bidders weren’t done. Nearly 20 minutes after the start of the auction, the last bid was finalized with an audible smash of Pylkkänen’s gavel. A buyer’s premium and fees would eventually be tacked on to the final bid, bringing the total price to $450,312,500.

Around 1,000 people were reportedly packed into Christie’s Auction House in New York to bear witness to the historic event, while thousands more watched a live-stream. The video now has more than 1.5 million views.

“It is every auctioneer’s ambition to sell a Leonardo and likely the only chance I will ever have,’ Pylkkänen said, according to Christie’s. “It’s the pinnacle of my career so far.”

“The excitement from the public for this work of art has been overwhelming and hugely heartening.”

Rank 1: Patek Philippe

Country of origin: Switzerland.

Below is the famous Patek Philippe Sky Moon Tourbillon:

Established in 1839 by Antoine Norbert de Patek, and Francois Czapek. Patek Philippe is a member of “The Holy Trinity” of watch brands and manufacturers. Patek Philippe is an independent and family owned watchmaker, though not by the founding family. Next to Rolex, Patek Philippe has the best resale value.

Between 1900 and 1939, Patek Philippe won more than 700 timekeeping prizes! Between 1900 and 1951, Patek Philippe won more than 300 first prizes! Patek Philippe won its awards at the Astronomical Observatory of Geneva in Switzerland.

Believe it or not, but it takes Patek Philippe 9 months to just manufacture the most basic timepieces.  All their watches are handmade by master artisans and watchmakers.

Patek Philippe is considered by many watch enthusiasts and connoisseurs to be the Nr 1 luxury wristwatch manufacturer and brand in the world. Patek Philippe bears the famous Patek Philippe Seal since 2009, which is a new and unprecedented quality standard for mechnical and automatic timepieces, and this standard goes beyond any of the standards in the Swiss watchmaking industry.

Patek Philippe is defined by words such as fine handicraftworkmanship and quality.

This legendary watchmaker manufactures their watches entirely by hand, and the manufacture and assembly are done by master artisans and watchmakers, on an extremely limited scale. Almost every single Patek Philippe watch, if not every single one, is a collectible timepiece.

Patek Philippe timepieces are meant for the connoisseurs and the collectors – Patek Philippe is not meant for mass production and mass consumption.

Patek Philippe timepieces are very rare even in comparison to other prestigious Swiss luxury watchmakers.

If you are collector, an enthusiast or if you have a slight streak of snobbery, Patek Philippe is the ultimate King of Luxury – it’s the luxury watch world’s equivalence to Rolls Royce – no expenses seem to be too great!

Patek Philippe – The 14 Ranking Criteria:

  1. Long and respected history (Yes)
  2. Limited supply – large demand (Yes – Patek Philippe is a very rare and exclusive brand with a very limited supply)
  3. Reputation/status/prestige (Yes – is an elite watchmaker. Patek Philippe is a member of the “Holy Trinity” and is consistently ranked amongst the top 3 or top 5 luxury watch brands of the world)
  4. Whether or not the brand is a fully independent watchmaker (Yes – Patek Philippe is fully independent and family owned)
  5. Pioneering spirit and innovations (Yes – Patek Philippe won more than 700 timekeeping prizes between 1900 and 1939 and won more than 300 first prizes between 1900 and 1951!)
  6. Impact on watchmaking history and modern culture (Yes – Patek Philippe is a member of the “Holy Trinity” and sets the gold standard for what luxury watches and higher watchmaking are all about)
  7. General in-house production (meaning every aspect of the manufacture is in-house) (Yes)
  8. In-house made movements (Yes)
  9. Movement complications (Yes – Patek Philippe is an expert on movement complications, but most of their watches use movements with rather basic time functions)
  10. Steel grade (Very good, but Patek Philippe relies to a large extent on making timepieces in 18 carat gold)
  11. Build quality (Very good)
  12. Price range (Very high)
  13. Good resale value (Excellent – the best resale value on the market besides Rolex)
  14. Market presence/Market share/Market dominance (No – Patek Philippe is a very small and marginal brand in terms of production volume)

 


Luxury Pocket Watch

 

Rank 2: Vacheron Constantin

Country of origin: Switzerland.

Established in 1755 by Jean-Marc Vacheron. Vacheron Constantin is a member of “The Holy Trinity” of Watch brands and manufacturers. Nowadays Vacheron Constantin is owned by Richemont Group.

Just like Audemars Piguet and Patek Philippe, Vacheron Constantin too is a member of the “Holy Trinity” of watches – the three most luxurious, and prestigious luxury watch brands offered on the watch market today.

Vacheron Constantin bears the Hallmark of Geneva, which is the highest quality certification a watchmaker can get. Vacheron Constantin is also a master of movement complication, movement decorations and artistic design. Out of the three members of the “Holy Trinity”, Vacheron Constantin is probably the most artistic one. Vacheron Constantin is legendary for their relief images applied on their dials, and their highly decorated watch cases, that are turned into an exquisite piece of art.

Vacheron Constantin – The 14 Ranking Criteria:

  1. Long and respected history (Yes – one of the 5 oldest luxury watch brands)
  2. Limited supply – large demand (Yes)
  3. Reputation/status/prestige (Yes – an elite watchmaker, and highly regarded amongst connoisseurs, but is in all fairness a rather anonymous brand)
  4. Whether or not the brand is a fully independent watchmaker (No – not independent. Vacheron Constantin is owned by Richemont Group)
  5. Pioneering spirit and innovations (Yes – Vacheron Constantin is an expert on haute horlogerie – meaning higher watchmaking and movement complications, and artistically made movements and cases)
  6. Impact on watchmaking history and modern culture (Yes – Vacheron Constantin is the oldest member of the “Holy Trinity”)
  7. General in-house production (meaning every aspect of the manufacture is in-house) (Yes)
  8. In-house made movements (Yes)
  9. Movement complications (Yes – Vacheron Constantin makes complicated movements, but most of their movements are just equipped with the basic functions)
  10. Steel grade (Very good, but Vacheron Constantin relies to a large extent on making timepieces in 18 carat gold)
  11. Build quality (Good)
  12. Price range (Very high)
  13. Good resale value (Mediocre)
  14. Market presence/Market share/Market dominance (No – Vacheron Constantin is a very small and marginal brand in terms of production volume)

 

Rank 3: Audemars Piguet

Country of origin: Switzerland.

Established in 1875 by Jules Louis Audemars, and Edward Auguste Piguet. Audemars Piguet is a member of “The Holy Trinity” of watch brands and manufacturers. Audemars Piguet an independent family owned brand. The manufacturer is still owned by the founding family.

Audemars Piguet is one of the finest and most celebrated luxury watchmakers ever. Audemars Piguet is a member of the “Holy Trinity” of watches – the three most luxurious, and prestigious luxury watch brands offered on the watch market today. The two other members of the “Holy Trinity” are Vacheron Constantin and Patek Philippe.

Not only is Audemars Piguet a member of the “Holy Trinity” – it’s a pioneer in watchmaking. The brand can boast with being the first in several fields:

  • In 1892, the first minute repeater wristwatch was developed and produced.
  • In 1915, the smallest five-minute repeater movement ever made, was developed. The diameter was a tiny 15.80mm.
  • In 1921, Audemars Piguet developed the first jumping-hour wristwatch.
  • In 1925, Audemars Piguet produced the world’s thinnest pocket watch movement – 1.32 mm thick.
  • In 1934, the first skeletonised pocket watch was developed.
  • In 1946, Audemars Piguet developed the world’s thinnest wristwatch.
  • In 1957, Audemars Piguet developed the first wristwatch equipped with a perpetual calendar.
  • In 1967, Audemars Piguet developed the world’s thinnest selfwinding automatic movement with a thickness of 2.45 mm.
  • In 1972, Audemars Piguet developed the legendary Royal Oak Collection – the first collection of high-end sports watches made of steel.
  • In 1978, Audemars Piguet developed the first ultra-thin automatic wristwatch with a perpetual calendar.
  • In 1986, Audemars Piguet developed the first ultra-thin automatic tourbillon wristwatch – merely 5.3 mm thick including the case – a feat in itself!
  • In 1989, Audemars Piguet invented the smallest automatic watch equipped with a perpetual calendar.
  • In 1996, Audemars Piguet developed the first automatic Grande complication watch.
  • In 1997, the first Grande Sonnerie chiming watch equipped with a minute repeater with three gongs and three hammers.
  • In 2000, Audemars Piguet invented the first watch with an Equation of Time, perpetual calendar, sunrise and sunset times.
  • In 2006, Audemars Piguet developed the first direct-impulse escapement.
  • In 2008, Audemars Piguet developed the first watch with a carbon case and carbon movement.
  • In 2009, Audemars Piguet developed a high-frequency chronometer, equipped with an escapement, and a double balance-spring.

Audemars Piguet’s success and fame are first and foremost attributable to the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Collection, and without this collection, Audemars Piguet would probably be an irrelevant brand – despite being an old brand dating back to 1875, and despite being a member of the “Holy Trinity”.

Without question, Audemars Piguet’s success and relevance, stand and fall with the Royal Oak Collection and it’s precisely for this reason that many people refer to Audemars Piguet as a “one model brand” or “one collection brand”.

Celebrities that are known to endorse Audemars Piguet are Lebron James, Michael Schumacher and Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Audemars Piguet – The 14 Ranking Criteria:

  1. Long and respected history (Yes)
  2. Limited supply – large demand (Yes – very exlusive brand)
  3. Reputation/status/prestige (Yes – an elite watchmaker)
  4. Whether or not the brand is a fully independent watchmaker (Yes – Audemars Piguet is fully independent)
  5. Pioneering spirit and innovations (Yes – Audemars Piguet is an expert on haute horlogerie – meaning higher watchmaking and movement complications)
  6. Impact on watchmaking history and modern culture (Yes – Audemars Piguet is a member of the “Holy Trinity”)
  7. General in-house production (meaning every aspect of the manufacture is in-house) (Yes)
  8. In-house made movements (Yes)
  9. Movement complications (Yes – but in all fairness most Audemars Piguet watches are just equipped with movements with basic functions)
  10. Steel grade (Very good, but Audemars Piguet relies to a large extent on making timepieces in 18 carat gold)
  11. Build quality (Very good)
  12. Price range (Very high)
  13. Good resale value (Mediocre)
  14. Market presence/Market share/Market dominance (No – Audemars Piguet is a small and marginal brand in terms of production volume)

 

Rank 4: A Lange & Söhne

Country of origin: Germany. This is the only prominent non-Swiss brand listed in the ranking.

Established in 1845 by Ferdinand A. Lange in Dresden, in Saxony in Germany. Nowadays A Lange & Söhne is owned by Richemont Group. This is a German luxury watch brand and the only non-Swiss brand among the top 15.

Due to WW2, the manufacture of this brand collapsed in 1948, but in 1990, the great grandchild of Adolph Lange – Walter Lange, reestablished the brand and the manufacture through the cooperation with other watchmakers, such as IWC Schaffhausen.

As far as movement quality and decorations are concerned, A Lange & Söhne is comparable to Audemars Piguet, Vacheron Constantin and Patek Philippe.

A Lange & Söhne is an expert on movement complications as well, and thusly this brand deservedly belongs to the category of higher watchmaking – haute horlogerie.

A Lange & Söhne is first and foremost famous for a collection of dress watches equipped with complications, called A Lange & Söhne Lange 1.

A Lange & Söhne – The 14 Ranking Criteria:

  1. Long and respected history (Yes)
  2. Limited supply – large demand (Yes – A Lange & Söhne is the very epitome of a super exclusive brand with a very limited supply of watches)
  3. Reputation/status/prestige (Yes – an elite watchmaker. Highly respected amongst connoisseurs but is in all fairness a very anonymous brand)
  4. Whether or not the brand is a fully independent watchmaker (No – not independent. A Lange & Söhne is owned by Richemont Group)
  5. Pioneering spirit and innovations (Yes – haute horlogerie – meaning handmade dress watches with movement complications)
  6. Impact on watchmaking history and modern culture (Fairly limited due to its small size)
  7. General in-house production (meaning every aspect of the manufacture is in-house) (Yes)
  8. In-house made movements (Yes)
  9. Movement complications (Yes – but in all fairness most of their watches use movements equipped with basic functions)
  10. Steel grade (Very good, but A Lange & Söhne relies to a large extent on making timepieces in 18 carat gold)
  11. Build quality (Very good)
  12. Price range (Very high)
  13. Good resale value (Mediocre)
  14. Market presence/Market share/Market dominance (No – A Lange & Söhne is a small and marginal brand in terms of production volume)

 

Rank 5: Rolex

Country of origin: United Kingdom.

Present-day country of origin: Switzerland.

Below is the legendary Rolex Submariner – the most famous divers watch ever made by Rolex, quite possibly the most famous divers watch ever made, and quite possibly the most iconic luxury watch ever made:

Originally British in 1905 – Swiss since 1919.

Established as Wilsdorf and Davis in 1905 by Hans Wilsdorf and Alfred Davis in London, United Kingdom. In 1908 Wilsdorf and Davis was renamed Rolex and in 1919, Rolex moved its operations to Geneva, Switzerland, where the watch manufacturer is located even today. Rolex is an independent brand.

Rolex has been an unmatched status and luxury symbol since the 1950s and the 1960s but got its legendary and mythical fame and reputation in the 1980s. That’s also when the price of Rolex watches dramatically increased.

Rolex has invented much of the modern wristwatch technology that we today take for granted:

  • That would include the modern automatic wristwatch movement.
  • The first water resistant watches – using the oyster shaped case, called the “oyster case”.
  • The screw-down-crown for divers watches.
  • Rolex was among the first brands that invented the first modern divers watches. Blancpain supposedly invented the very first modern divers watch – the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms in 1953. Rolex however launched the legendary Rolex Submariner the very same year. If Blancpain indeed was the very first, then Rolex wasn’t far behind.
  • Rolex invented the first watches equipped with a date function – the legendary Rolex Datejust, launched in 1945.
  • Rolex was the first watch manufacturer and brand to invent GMT-movements, for measuring time in a second time zone. The watch is called Rolex GMT Master and was launched in 1955.

Rolex is an interesting brand and watchmaker. Outside Swatch Group, Rolex is the only 100% independent watchmaking giant, where every aspect of the manufacture takes place in-house. Yes there are a few independent brands besides Rolex, but they are dwarves in comparison to Rolex – a true financial and industrial giant and powerhouse. Rolex alone has a 20% market share in the luxury watch industry. In 2012, Forbes decided to rank Rolex as the 57th most powerful global brand.

Rolex is famous for using the 904L stainless steel alloy – the best steel grade on the market. Rolex is famous for having an unmatched build quality, unmatched reputation and fame, unmatched resale value, extremely accurate, reliable, shock resistant and anti-magnetic 100% in-house made movements, that use the famous Rolex made parachrom hairspring which is 100% anti-magnetic and 10 times more shock resistant than ordinary hairsprings used by other brands.

Rolex is known for a plethora of collections: Submariner, Sea Dweller, GMT-Master II, Yacht-Master, Sky-Dweller, Datejust, Daytona, Explorer, Milgauss, Perpetual and Perpetual Date. Few watchmakers can boast with such a long list of legendary high quality collections.

All Rolex watches are COSC certified and Rolex’s accuracy rate is equivalent to 99.998%.

Rolex is also known for having been the luxury wristwatch of Ian Fleming’s literary creation – James Bond 007.

The Rolex Submariner was the original “James Bond Watch” throughout the 1960s, and parts of the 1970s and 1980s, and has been worn by Bond actors Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore and Timothy Dalton.

Rolex – The 14 Ranking Criteria:

  1. Long and respected history (No – Rolex isn’t that old. Rolex was launched in 1905)
  2. Limited supply – large demand (No – Rolex isn’t exclusive in terms of supply and demand. Rolex is the largest high end luxury watch manufacturer in all of Switzerland in terms of production volume and supply)
  3. Reputation/status/prestige (Yes – an elite watchmaker. Rolex’s reputation and fame on the luxury watch market are unmatched)
  4. Whether or not the brand is a fully independent watchmaker (Yes – Rolex is fully independent)
  5. Pioneering spirit and innovations (Yes – Rolex is the only luxury watch brand that uses the 904L stainless steel, invented the modern automatic wristwatch movement, the first water resistant watches, invented the screw-down-crown for divers watches, made amongst the first divers watches – the Submariner in 1953, made the first automatic watch equipped with a date movement – the Rolex Datejust in 1945, and invented the first GMT watch – the Rolex GMT Master in 1955)
  6. Impact on watchmaking history and modern culture (Yes – take the above mentioned innovations, and add to them the fact that Rolex has been an unmatched status symbol since the 1950s, was James Bond’s original watch in both the Bond books and the Bond movies, and was used for the deep sea dives in 1960 and 2012)
  7. General in-house production (meaning every aspect of the manufacture is in-house) (Yes – 100% in-house made)
  8. In-house made movements (Yes – 100% in-house made)
  9. Movement complications (No – they are very rare. Maybe the Rolex Sky Dweller would qualify to be called “higher watchmaking”)
  10. Steel grade. (Excellent – 904L stainless steel is the best in the industry)
  11. Build quality (Excellent)
  12. Price range (Very high)
  13. Good resale value (Excellent – the best resale value on the market besides Patek Philippe)
  14. Market presence/Market share/Market dominance (Yes – Rolex is by far the largest high end luxury watch manufacturer in all of Switzerland in terms of production volume)